Archive for the ‘Discussion’ Category

WoW.com :: Rumor: Blizzard Employee’s Real Life Names Will Not Appear on the Real ID Forums

Wow.com has reported this afternoon a number of disturbing pieces of information that have come to light around the whole Real ID means real names on the official forums controversy.

While I don’t think that anyone can debate that Blizzard employees can’t have their real lives disturbed or intruded upon by in-game issues (the last thing a community moderator or GM needs is to be followed to their home or be contacted personally because they locked a thread or didn’t provide an answer sufficient to someone who takes the game entirely too seriously) the rumor that Blizzard employees will be exempt from the changes implies that Blizzard definitely understands the severity of what they’re doing, but simply haven’t decided to extend that concern to their customers as well as their employees. Here’s what WoW.com had to say about it:

So here’s what we know:

  • Bashiok / Drysc posted his real life name yesterday, and had his privacy violated by people posting maps to his house, his parents’ names, and (potentially incorrect) cell phone numbers.
  • We have seen multiple reports of WoW players who have called up Blizzard’s support line and spoken with representatives who’ve told them blues will no longer be using their real names in the new forums.
  • Josh, a Blizzard phone rep said that Blizzard employees “cannot risk having their personal lives compromised by in-game issues.”
  • Blizzard blue representative Rygarius locked, but did not delete nor deny, a thread on this.
  • WoW.com has emailed PR contacts within Blizzard for comment, and have not heard anything back.

As with the previous post, I’m of two minds of this – first, it’s unfortunate that it’s clear to Blizzard the gravity of this change. They know it, but they’re moving forward with their player-base anyway. It’s also likely that Blizzard employees will be exempt from other Real ID concerns, like the friends-of-friends feature. On the other hand, I completely empathize with Blizzard employees, who are more likely to be targeted because of who they are and who they work for.

So while I’m not saying this should go forward and Blizzard employees should be left out and the rest of us forced to comply, I am saying that Blizzard should (and they likely will if the uproar continues) come up with a middle ground where people’s privacy can be protected to at least some degree, instead of taking an all or nothing approach.

We’ll wait and see what WoW.com turns up in the way of confirm/deny of the rumor, but in the meantime, the controversy is still simmering (especially in this massive thread), and more and more stories like this one are appearing, where people are able to use such limited information like a player’s real name, whatever associated information there is about them, and the powers of Google to dig up a lot of personal detail about them.

UPDATE: According to Blizzard, they’re sticking to their guns and their employees’ real names WILL be used on the forums. From the original WoW.com post:

According to Nethaera, they’re going to stick with their original plan and have blue posters use their real names. As to why other parts of Blizzard are saying something different (WoW.com has verified what other parts of Blizzard has said), it appears they’re having some internal communication issues.

Blizzard to Begin Throttling Inspect Requests: The End of GearScore?

Rumors were flying at the end of last week that Blizzard would begin throttling server information requests, like inspection requests used by mouse-over add-ons that look at the gear of the player being examined piece by piece – like the infamous GearScore.

Just as soon as the rumors started to hit the boiling point and people on both sides of the discussion were claiming hallelujah, this was the end for GearScore or alternatively, how dare Blizzard target GearScore with a change like this, Nethaera made a post on the official forums to both confirm the point and clarify the reasoning behind it:

It’s important to understand that the throttling that is being done isn’t intended to break any functionality of add-ons, but merely to control the amount of queries that are being sent to the server at any given time. (Thus throttling the queries.) The queries will still occur, it just won’t happen as quickly as they currently seem to. You can read the statements that WoW Ace and WoW Interface have up for a bit more information on these changes. We wanted to give mod authors a heads-up prior to making the change so that they could make any adjustments they needed to on their mods.

http://wowinterface.com/forums/showthread.php?t=33432
http://www.wowace.com/announcements/blizzard-to-start-throttling-inspect-requests/

Nethaera makes a great point. I try to keep a technical eye on the machinations behind the scenes at Blizzard (see Additional Instances Cannot Be Launched: A Technical Perspective) and the rationale makes sense. While I don’t think that GearScore alone is breaking the game – which is the defense that some people are raising – I think that the proliferation of add-ons that query the game servers regularly in rapid succession can definitely drag down overall performance, and it wouldn’t take too many people running the same series of add-ons regularly that insist on querying the servers for in-game information that the default UI traditionally doesn’t make available (especially on-mouseover) to drag down server performance for everyone.

Still, what do you think? Is this the end of GearScore and add-ons like it, or will their developers simply find ways to adapt over time? Are you glad to see add-ons like these go, or are they just valuable tools that people are using poorly? Sound off in the comments!

When is a toon ready for raiding?

I’m not really the raiding type, but I am the curious type. I’ve always been curious about Ulduar, and doing all of Naxxramas. Or seeing Icecrown Citadel just once. I wouldn’t mind getting the Kingslayer title. I am also not a fan of GearScore. I understand all of the arguments for and against. I look at it like this. I am horribly undergeared and I have healed Trial of the Champion, The Forge of Souls and The Pit of Saron with just over a 2,000 gearscore. Granted, as I got some better pieces of gear those events definitely went easier. I feared for my healing ability in these and expressed concern when the Dungeon Finder dropped me into Trial of the Champion for my very first Heroic after hitting level 80. Yeah. I digress and get back to my original point.

While I dislike GearScore, it is a tool. It is also a tool that is used by many people. It’s overused by the Horde on my server and I figured that playing an Alliance character may open other doors for me. My question is this: At what point are you able to ask to join PUG groups or Naxxramas, or Ulduar? Is there a GearScore that is a decent indicator of when people may or may not let you in on their raids? I understand that this is server dependent, but doing google search after google search has not afforded me with even a hint of an answer. Any raiders out there who might know the answer to this? What are the requirement differences for 10-man versus 25-man? Help a girl out and point me in the right direction. Please!

Real ID and Real Concerns

Note: I started to write this article with an entirely different spin on Real ID and what I think about it, but new information has changed things a bit. Read on to find out what I discovered.

My Friends List

Friend List

One of the features of the recent 3.3.5 patch that I was most looking forward to happened to be the Real ID chat ability. Maybe I was mistaken, but it seems that there is a lot of concern regarding the privacy issues that come along with a feature like Real ID.

Real ID is meant to be a way to chat with players across different realms, across faction, as well as across different games using the Battle.net system. This is especially important when Starcraft II is released late July and many WoW players will be spreading their time between the two games. I can’t speak for all WoW players, but I know that my boyfriend and I will probably be spending a hefty portion of our free time trying the new Blizzard game.

The concept of Real ID is awesome. It’s something many other types of systems implement in different ways. Steam uses a universal chat system when you’re logged in. The difference with Steam is that you can choose to stay anonymous with regard to what people see. Real ID seems to be lacking in the privacy settings being available to the user to choose.

According to Blizzard’s Real ID FAQ, “Both players must first mutually agree to become Real ID friends.” Basically don’t go willy-nilly giving our your account email address and adding strangers as friends. As a tool, this can be really awesome. It’ll let you keep in touch with people with whom you regularly chat with even if they’re not logged into your game at the moment. If you need help doing something and see a friend online, a simple asking couldn’t hurt. This can easily be abused in wanting to have at your disposal a large group of people available to play games with. The child I’m taking care of has friended everyone and anyone he can on his XBox Live account. This works on XBox Live, where you don’t see any information that you don’t want to share. This definitely is not the case with Real ID.

The “Real ID is a system designed to be used with people you know and trust in real life — friends, co-workers and family”.

I would suggest you heed that bit of advice, because this next bit threw me for a whirlwind! Originally, I was thinking this system was great! A nice way to keep in touch with my Horde friends while I’m playing Alliance. Or with my boyfriend who juggles his time between his 7 (yes, that’s seven) level 80s. But oh ho ho, Miss Medicina let her readers in on a secret (or not so secret since it’s right there in the FAQ) that was not highly publicized about Real ID.

If you are using Real ID, your mutual Real ID friends, as well as their Real ID friends, will be able to see your first and last name (the name registered to the Battle.net account). You will also be able to see the first and last name of your Real ID friends and their Real ID friends.

Take a minute and reread that. Say this with me now. “Um, wut?!” Now let’s think about this for just a minute. You and I Real ID friend each other. But I also have my boyfriend, a Los Angeles friend, and a local real life friend Real ID-friended. You don’t know these other people. You probably don’t give a crap about these people. But you can see that they’re my friends. Not only that, but you see their real names. Not the online persona that many of us have grown to be associated with. I will always respond to Mailynn (in it’s various different spellings). But now your friends, who are strangers to me, can see my real name. And in turn, google it. Fine. I’m safe. Most of you can google my name now, but you’ll find a whole lot of articles about some older gentleman who’s the CEO of some company in the mid-west and is not even remotely related to me. I’m safe. I’m going to assume that not everyone is as lucky as I am to have an internet twin that gets more attention than you… and is of the opposite gender.

So I Real ID friended someone I know on Horde side. I know personal information about him. I know his girlfriend’s name. I know how many children he has. I know where about he lives. I know who is best friend is. The point is, I consider him a friend, despite only having known him in game. I’m okay with having him friended via Real ID and getting the chance to chat with him whenever I want to. I am not okay with the fact that my boyfriend’s name, my Los Angeles friend’s name and my in town friend’s name will be viewable by my Horde friend. This is overstepping some major boundaries.

At first I thought this was great. I’m going to get those people I love to chat with all the time and friend them! It’s okay, we’re friends!! I didn’t realize that Blizzard opened the door to cyber-stalking to the Nth degree. What changed my mind? I asked my friend Kurn via Facebook to be Real ID friends. She is the reason why I play WoW. I miss our days from Eldre’Thalas. I miss having her as a friend I chatted with regularly. She took her toon to other servers and that’s okay, so did I. Real ID should have been the perfect opportunity for us to keep in touch again.

She very politely told me “No” and the reasons why. She brought to my attention the dangers of Real ID, and not just the overblown perceived dangers. Sharing real life information across the game to people who are not friended is not okay. Do you hear me Blizzard?!??! Make this a feature that can be either a) turned off or b) removed entirely. I am truly missing out on the ability to chat with someone I adore and love because she has privacy concerns. Hell, I now have privacy concerns and may consider removing everyone but the boyfriend just to keep the information sharing to a minimum.

What’s your take on all of this? Are you going to simply ignore all Real ID requests? Do you think I’m making too much out of this? I’m curious to know.

Couples that Raid Together Stay Together!

Over at WoW.com, I found one of the most adorable and sweet posts I’ve ever seen in my life: Breakfast Topic: Things my wife and I have done in WoW – Matthew Rossi, one of my favorite authors at WoW.com, outlines how it was actually his wife that introduced him to WoW.com (which was WoW Insider at the time) and that he plays WoW with.

I can echo the sentiment – the lovely lady I’m seeing also plays WoW, and while we used to play on the same server, she left for a more interesting place for the way she plays and I hung around mostly because I liked the raiding I was doing at the time. Both of us have been away from the game for a while, but it’s hard to imagine that she got started in the game when I had just signed up for an account back in the vanilla days and I bought her a copy for Valentine’s Day of all days, because she really wanted to play it.

Between Rossi and I, we’re proof positive that couples that raid together stay together – that is to say, if you share interests and likes and dislikes with your partner, you’re likely to stick together through the hard times, even if it doesn’t always seem so.

So what about you? Does your significant other play WoW? Do you think they ever would, or would you try to get them into the game? Let us know in the comments!

News and Thoughts from the World of Warcraft: Cataclysm Press Tour

Blizzard took the media on a whirlwind tour of some of the new features and changes coming in World of Warcraft: Cataclysm at the end of last week, and dropped a few bombshells that were worth paying attention to, especially for those who are looking forward to the expansion based on information that’s been previously provided. The bulk of the details are over at MMO Champion’s post about the tour, but there are some significant changes worth highlighting here:

Path of the Titans is gone
The whole Path of the Titans idea has been removed from the game. It will no longer rely on Archeology or on any kind of PvE/PvP progression and instead Blizzard will just introduce a new type of glyphs: Medium Glyphs.

Medium Glyphs will add a “fun factor” to abilities, and it wouldn’t be surprising to see something similar to the Fortification or Breakthrough glyphs first previewed during Blizzcon 2009. (But probably not these exact glyphs, a lot of stuff happened since last year)

Guild Talents are gone
The guild talents are gone and your guild now gets extra bonuses depending on its level. There are 25 levels and each level will automatically reward with more cool stuff. The leveling process remains unchanged and your guild will gain experience through PvP, Dungeon and Raid progression, questing, etc …

Guild currency has also been removed and rewards will just be “unlocked” after you reach a specific level or complete a guild achievement. Once a reward is unlocked, members will be able to purchase it with gold. Some of the rewards include guild tabards, mounts, heirlooms, and it looks like you will finally be able to have a guild tabard on your mount. (Just like the Argent Tournament banners)

New members of a guild won’t be able to buy everything directly, they will have to contribute to the progression of the guild before they can access the top rewards. Each time a player helps towards the leveling he will gain reputation with the guild, the best rewards will require players to be exalted with their guild before they can buy it.

Archeology will be less important
With the Path of the Titans gone, Archeology will become a “true” secondary profession and you won’t really have to level it anymore. However it will still be used to let you get cosmetic/optional items, get more information on the game’s lore, and ultimately it looks like we can expect rewards similar to fishing. (Nothing mandatory, but you’ll be happy when you actually find something)

Information gathered from other sites:
You will find two types of items: Common Artifacts will give you more information on the lore of a race, and might be used in some kind of collection game. Rare items will give you usable items, most of them will be cosmetic but some of them will have actual effects.

I have to admit, I’m pretty disappointed by this spate of news. I thought that Path of the Titans, Guild Talents, and Archeology all sounded like a lot of fun and I was looking forward to all of them being in the game and playing an integral role in the way that guilds and groups evolved. I also thought that these changes were finally going to do something to shake up the way Guilds are made and operate in the game, and I’m afraid that with so many of the guild-wide changes removed we’ll just go back to the way guilds are now; an implementation that I think could use some serious improvement and encouragement from Blizzard.

That’s the bad news, but there is good news:

Raids and Dungeons Split
Raid leaders will be able to split an ongoing 25-man raid into up to three 10-man raids. Those 10-man raids will be able to continue from that point on, with bosses already down.

So far it looks like it won’t be possible to merge 10-man raids into 25-man raids, for obvious reasons.

Information gathered from other sites:
Raid IDs should be much more flexible. You will be able to join any raid as long as it doesn’t have any bosses up that you have already killed.
There will be more Algalon-style encounters—ultra-hard optional bosses for hardcore players only.

Rated Battlegrounds
Rated battlegrounds will be available for pre-mades of 10, 15 and 25-player sizes. The amount of Conquest points rewarded will be capped so that players who enjoy both arenas and rated battlegrounds don’t feel they have to prioritize one over the other.

Information gathered from other sites:
The classic Honor titles will be coming back and rewarded to the top teams each season.
The “Gladiator” equivalent teams will also receive epic ground mounts. Ground mounts because they want to reward something you can ride in the battleground and be proud of / show off.

Now that’s pretty cool – and the new raids and instances look cool too. It sounds like a lot of the changes they’re making as far as rated battlegrounds and guild achievements will help alleviate the loss of some of the more interesting guild talents and features that I was looking forward to. Additionally, the changes to raids and lockouts will encourage more people to get involved and will allow people to progress without having to reconvene raids multiple times if they don’t get all the way through somewhere – the whole force of a 25-man raid can do a certain amount, and then a few 10-mans that can meet on different times of the week can continue the 10-man version of the content from there. I like that idea.

Here’s the trick though, I caught this little tidbit further down the thread notes:

Heroic Deadmines / Shadowfang Keep
Heroic versions of classic instances might not be ready for the release of Cataclysm and will be shipped in content patch instead.

Okay – this may not seem like a big deal (unless you were really hoping for those heroics come Cataclysm) but it tells me something that I’m worried about, something that was magnified with the removal of Path of the Titans and Guild Talents: Blizzard may be rushing this thing.

Seriously, at Blizzcon last year, we were all so thrilled to see that Blizzard had been making so much progress with Cataclysm at the time and that it looked so good, but considering the way they’re scaling back some of the content changes tells me either that they’re pushing for a release (likely this year) and don’t have time to implement everything they want to, or they’re worried that some of the changes they want to will be too much upkeep for their team. (I wouldn’t want to be the people who have to balance Guild Talents…what do you do when one turns out to clearly be the best and ALL of the guilds in the game flock to one tree?)

Now at the same time, the flip side to this may be simpler – Blizzard may have just decided that some of these changes just weren’t good ideas. But the notion that the Heroic Deadmines and Heroics Shadowfang Keep, two things fans have been craving for ages, may be delayed, tells me that Blizzard has a lot on their plate and their timeline is in jeopardy. If that’s the case, the question then becomes: “what’s still on the plate that made Path of the Titans, Guild Talents, and, while not cancelled – just postponed, Heroic Deadmines and Shadowfang fall off? We’ll just have to wait until a full beta starts and the NDA is lifted to find out.

Waiting for Cataclysm

Cataclysm is months away at least, the alpha is raging on but even a private beta hasn’t been announced, and the only content we have to look forward to before Cataclysm is released will be the Ruby Sanctum, the retaking of Gnomeregan, and the quest to retake the Echo Isles….not to mention all of the pre-planning and world events that will lay the foundation for the events in Cataclysm….okay fine, there’s plenty to look forward to before Cataclysm hits store shelves, but that’s not the point.

It’s clear that we’re through all of the major content for this expansion. So now that Wrath of the Lich King is about over and done with from a story and lore perspective, what are you doing while you wait for the next big event, raid, dungeon, or feature to drop?

I’ve seen a number of people taking breaks from the game so they can come back fresh when Cataclysm is ramping up, and I’ve also seen a number of people taking the time to do their “bucket lists” of achievements and events that will likely go away once the expansion is released and Azeroth is irrevocably changed. Others are just bored, running around in circles or doing battlegrounds or leveling alts – how are you passing the time? Let us know in the comments!

Discussion: Are YOU Going to Blizzcon?

So the first day of Blizzcon ticket sales came and went in about a half-hour last night after they went on sale, and there’s only one day left — this Sunday — when tickets will go on sale again and everyone who didn’t get one yesterday combined with everyone who specifically planned on waiting for this Sunday will flood the Blizzard Store to try and get theirs.

So what about you? Are you planning a trip to Blizzcon this year? Have you purchased your ticket already or are you planning on grabbing one Sunday? Shot it out in the comments and let us know!

What Does Live Podcasting Mean to the WoW Community?

Over at the venerable WoW.com, they made a pretty big announcement with regard to the incredibly popular WoW Insider Show last week – essentially that they’ll be ditching the weekly UStream podcast recording sessions in favor of offline (as in, private-Skype calls, not offline as in off the internet) recording sessions where the editors and their special guests will converse without the chat channel. They say that this will improve the timing and quality of the recording and the show overall, and allow them more leeway to do interesting things with the show.

All of those things are very likely true – it’s one thing to try and record an hour-long show in one take, dealing with whatever audio issues or connectivity issues you have on the assigned time and date – and it’s another thing to be able to record a show in multiple segments over the course of a week and have an editor assemble them into a complete and good-sounding show – it’s the reason the majority of television isn’t live. But with the benefits come tradeoffs. First, what the folks at WoW.com had to say:

So, to that end, we’re doing a few things differently.

* Recorded intros and teasers for the show.
* Technology for the show’s backend
* Provide detailed notes, along with a “here’s what you’re missing” clip, for each show, so you can decide at a glance whether this particular week will be up your alley.


However, one thing that will be changing is the live format. Because of the increased emphasis on production, we’ve made the decision not to record live each Saturday on Ustream. The podcast team, or rather the significant others of the podcast team, also found the middle-of-the-weekend broadcast schedule problematic, and our couches aren’t very comfortable. So, instead, every Monday morning we’ll deliver a fresh podcast for you to listen to via download, streaming audio, or iTunes. We know this affects a large number of you who listen to the show each week in the chat channel, and hopefully you’ll be pleased with the other changes.

Let’s be absolutely clear – I’m in support of the folks at WoW.com and their desire to improve their show and put out a high quality product. They won’t be the first group of podcasters I listen to that decided to hop off of uStream or LiveStream and do some serious production and post-production before releasing their show. But as they say in the blurb above, the change will impact the massive group of people who have come to use the Saturday afternoon podcast recording as a rallying point, myself included.

So while part of my curiosity comes from what I feel I’ll be missing, there’s a large number of World of Warcraft-related podcasts that use live streams to build their own fan base and community, and to draw attention to themselves and give their fans a way to interact with the hosts while the show is being recorded. Podcasts like the Twisted Nether Blogcast and RawrCast are great examples of podcasts that have a good, strong community behind their live streams, and The WoW Insider Show was one of those as well – people really came to the live stream to talk with the folks they see every week, crack jokes in the channel, and weigh in on the topics as they were being discussed. If they were lucky, they would get their names or their points mentioned on the show. It was truly interactive.

Now that WoW.com has decided that its podcast won’t be live anymore, I wonder what this means to the rest of the WoW community – will other shows go offline as well, or decide that essentially recording in front of a “live studio audience” simply isn’t as important as putting our a highly polished show? Or perhaps the belief is that you simply can’t have a highly polished show recording in one take and in front of a chat channel? (I think the Twisted Nether Blogcast is proof this isn’t the case: they put out a great product every week even though they record in multiple takes and segments in front of a live stream that’s highly interactive.)

I doubt that the podcasts and blogs that use their live show recording as a rallying point for their readers and fans will be quick to drop them – WoW.com has gotten big enough that they don’t need the community that grew up around their live shows to succeed and for the show to still be popular as a download, but other blogs and groups may not have that same luxury. Personally, I’ve been known to listen to multiple WoW podcasts both in the live stream for one experience and then downloaded through iTunes during the week at the office – so I can go either way with it. This change won’t stop me from listening to and enjoying the WoW Insider show, but I will certainly miss the live chat and hope its loss results in a better show for everyone.

What do you think? Do you think this is an anomaly, or will it have a ripple effect across the community? Are the folks at WoW.com just interested in putting out a better show and there’s nothing more to it, or is it a move for convenience to the podcasters despite the fans? Let us know in the comments.

Why I Love Playing a Hunter, or My Scatter Shot Brings All the Girls to The Yard

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0l4T9kRlBE[/youtube]

Of all the classes and characters I have, the only class I have more than one of is the hunter. My main is a hunter, and while my first character wasn’t a hunter, I quickly gravitated to the class and wound up playing one up through 60 during vanilla. When my friends and I changed servers during Burning Crusade, I was hesitant to transfer the hunter I had put so much energy and effort into, so what did I do? Roll a new hunter on the new server to see whether or not I wanted to stay there.

That hunter quickly became my main, and I even wound up transferring my other hunter (along with a number of other characters) to the new server. Whenever I log in, I default to my hunter, even though I would love to spend a little more time with some of my lower-level alts who desperately need some time and attention, and would change up some of my gameplay and give me some variation in the game. Still, I love the hunter class, and I love playing a hunter. Why? It’s simple – the hunter is probably one of the most dynamic, most accessible at entry but challenging at the end classes in the game.

People go on and on about how hunters are easy to level and every piece of gear is “hunter gear,” and while I think the former is true and the latter is on purpose, they’re both very positive things. The hunter is probably one of the classes in the game that’s the easiest to play through and the easiest with which to experience the game, and the easiest entry-level classes to play. At the same time, the hunter is probably one of the most challenging classes at the end of the game to play really really well.

The fact that everything is “hunter loot” is a double-edged sword – it opens the door to hunters being able to wear just about any weapon, debate whether their own mail is better than leather designed for rogues, and so on – but that’s the beauty of it – you may be able to wear anything, but that doesn’t mean that everything is good for you. It’s very easy to trip yourself up wearing something that looks good but kills you in a different way. The hunter, especially at end-game and in raiding, is one of the most cerebral classes, where talent builds, glyphs, enchants, and gems all make the difference between being a good hunter and a great hunter; doing good DPS and doing amazing DPS.

It’s those challenges, combined with the ability to really soar through the game at lower levels and make tangible improvements, makes the hunter probably the most attractive class in the game for me. The hunter “experience,” as in leveling the class, experiencing the game through the eyes of the hunter, is probably some of the most well defined experiences in the game, and not nearly as disjointed as some of the other classes where you just don’t feel like the way the class plays through the game ties well into the way Azeroth is evolving.

That being said, there’s something to being essentially a ranger with a pet; playing two objects at once – being able to send in your pet and do damage from far away, and being uniquely able to solo encounters and battles that other classes simply can’t do alone.

The hunter is one of the few classes in the game where it’s easy to play, takes some thought to be good, and takes a lot of thought to be great. The difference between the low-end hunters (the so-called “huntards”) and the high-end hunters who are proud of their skills and abilities (and make no mistake, I know plenty of high-end hunters with great gear and great raiding experience but still only a half-idea of how to play their classes, meaning they’ve gone through the motions of being great, but they just fail at thinking so they’re stuck at the back of the pack) is huge – moreso than just about any other class.

Plus? The hunter class is just sexy. I mean really, come on. Admit it.

So what’s your favorite class? Which class do you just love, no matter which class is your main? Shout it out in the comments!

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